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1  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Wall gap
 on: Dec 10th, 2017, 4:43pm 
Started by Feature6 | Post by Feature6  
Thank you guys.
I will have a look for mastic. The wall shouldn't drop anymore as I've sorted the cause but I guess it's a good idea to setup a check in case it subsides any more.

2  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Wall gap
 on: Dec 8th, 2017, 7:12pm 
Started by Feature6 | Post by woodsmith  
Looks like subsidence to me too. First thing is to check if it is still moving. You could get a 25x150mm length of glass and fix it with epoxy resin so that it spans the joint. Give it a few months to see if the glass breaks, if so it is still moving and you need to fix it, possibly by knocking the wall down and putting new footings in. If it isn't moving you could fill the gap with a non setting mastic like Sikaflex EBT.

3  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Steel lintel above window sticks out
 on: Dec 8th, 2017, 7:05pm 
Started by alimc | Post by woodsmith  
It looks like a Catnic type lintel to me. You wouldn't use a steel I beam or concrete lintel in this position.

4  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Wall gap
 on: Dec 8th, 2017, 7:01pm 
Started by Feature6 | Post by thescruff  
Image 3

That looks like subsidence, eg the whole wall has sunk.

You could pack it with the expansion strips as existing and then face it with mastic

5  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Wall gap
 on: Dec 8th, 2017, 11:48am 
Started by Feature6 | Post by Feature6  
Image 1

Hi there,
sorry I don't know how to rotate the image.

I have this gap appearing between two walls in the garden. I know it's down to some heavy gates pulling the wall to one side, but that is fixed now. I just need some advice on filling the gap. Do I need to remove the sealant or whatever it is, and if so how. And then what shall I use to fill it.

Many thanks

6  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Steel lintel above window sticks out
 on: Dec 8th, 2017, 9:59am 
Started by alimc | Post by thescruff  
londonman wrote on Dec 8th, 2017, 9:02am:
That's never a lintel. Lintels these days are concrete.  If it was steel then it would be a I-section....so where's the other half of the I ?

More likely a lead strip...easy enough for the OP to find out,  If he can move it with his fingers then it's lead.


I keep looking at the head of the window and wondering what is holding it up, it looks likes about a 20mm render.

7  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Steel lintel above window sticks out
 on: Dec 8th, 2017, 9:02am 
Started by alimc | Post by londonman  
That's never a lintel. Lintels these days are concrete.  If it was steel then it would be a I-section....so where's the other half of the I ?

More likely a lead strip...easy enough for the OP to find out,  If he can move it with his fingers then it's lead.

8  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Replacing a Damp Proof Course
 on: Dec 8th, 2017, 7:48am 
Started by Carlir86 | Post by Natedog  
thescruff wrote on Dec 6th, 2017, 10:56am:
Sounds like it was built on a floodplain in which case you'll never stop it.

On the other hand, if you dry the clay out the place will likely crack and fall down anyway


There's a new estate just been built other end of town from me.  It's been built in a field that was always the first place the river flooded into, but they did a bit of earthworks to make a mound along the river to stop it flooding.  Roughly a third of the houses have visible movement in the roof already Undecided

9  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Replacing a Damp Proof Course
 on: Dec 6th, 2017, 10:56am 
Started by Carlir86 | Post by thescruff  
Sounds like it was built on a floodplain in which case you'll never stop it.

On the other hand, if you dry the clay out the place will likely crack and fall down anyway

10  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Replacing a Damp Proof Course
 on: Dec 5th, 2017, 11:02pm 
Started by Carlir86 | Post by woodsmith  
You would only normally tank a basement so they should be able to replace your damp proofing to your floor without the need to tank it. Even with water under your floor though it shouldn't have produced damp in the house unless it rose above floor level.

11  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Replacing a Damp Proof Course
 on: Dec 5th, 2017, 6:44pm 
Started by Carlir86 | Post by CWatters  
PS: There is little point in just tanking. For example if the flood water gets into the drains it will come in via your WC etc. I think there are ways to prevent this as well (one way flood valves?) but I'm no expert.

It needs a carefully thought out solution rather than a piece meal approach.


12  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Replacing a Damp Proof Course
 on: Dec 5th, 2017, 6:41pm 
Started by Carlir86 | Post by CWatters  
Presumably you mean the Damp Proof Membrane (DPM) rather than the Damp Proof Course (DPC). The DPC goes between brick courses in the wall. The DPM is a sheet in/on the floor that should be lapped up the wall to at least the DPC.

Yes the DPM can and should be replaced once any investigation has been completed. Joints between sheets overlapped or better still sealed.

If soakaways don't work where does rainwater falling on the roof go? Ideally you would like rainwater/surface and water under the floor to go into the drains but not many water companies allow "mixed connections" any more.

The alternative is very large soakaways or even a soakaway mound covering a large area of land. Possibly discharge to a watercourse/ditch if one handy.

The void below the floor should also be ventilated to encourage any water under the floor to evaporate away. Look for periscope vents alow down round the outside of the block.

Good luck.

13  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Replacing a Damp Proof Course
 on: Dec 5th, 2017, 2:20pm 
Started by Carlir86 | Post by Carlir86  
We brought a new build ground floor flat and after flooding 3 times in 7 years the insurance company pulled up the entire DPC within the flat and lifted the block slabs to view the sub floor void were they discovered water. The Sub Soil of the development is clay and the soakaways obviously do not work.

The NHBC are scoping works and have said tanking the property is not an option as the rest of the site would still flood. Whatever solution they come up with for the site, in respect of our contained flat the DPC has been removed so can this be replaced??? or does the property need to be tanked anyway?

14  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Roof moss
 on: Dec 5th, 2017, 9:55am 
Started by Natedog | Post by thescruff  
Copper will do the job but Zinc will do it better for less loot.

More money but you can buy a zink faced flashband type product that simply sticks on the ridge

15  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Roof moss
 on: Dec 4th, 2017, 5:28pm 
Started by Natedog | Post by Natedog  
I've got a few long-ish lengths of 15mm copper pipe.  Might try slitting it along it's length and opening it out flat.

Thanks matey Smiley

16  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Roof moss
 on: Dec 3rd, 2017, 4:45pm 
Started by Natedog | Post by woodsmith  
There are various chemicals available but they don't give a lasting protection. To eradicate the moss for years you would need to fix a copper or zinc flashing to, or just below, the ridge. Westfalia sell a self adhesive copper strip which would do the trick if you can get up to the ridge safely. Trouble is it doesn't look very sightly having a broad copper band stuck to the roof. You may be able to get some thin sheet copper and fabricate something yourself, perhaps try a small area first and see how well it works.

17  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Roof moss
 on: Dec 3rd, 2017, 4:03pm 
Started by Natedog | Post by Natedog  
Every winter we have problems with the gutters and more importantly the "valley" roof  (it's not s proper valley) getting blocked with moss that has come off the roof.

Short of climbing on the roof every 6 months to clean it all off, is there anything I can treat the roof with to kill it off and stop it coming back?

18  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Attic conversion
 on: Dec 1st, 2017, 4:33pm 
Started by JohnOmcc1983 | Post by thescruff  
That age/build of roof/loft probably only has 3x2 ceiling joists and not load bearing

19  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Re: Attic conversion
 on: Dec 1st, 2017, 12:19pm 
Started by JohnOmcc1983 | Post by woodsmith  
You could engage a structural engineer to look at this or, perhaps better still, find a specialist loft converter who should be able to answer your questions. The support beam is called a purlin and you definitely can't remove the brace or replace it with a vertical one without an engineer's report and building consent. As for building a brick wall underneath to support it, or swapping it for steel, whilst it may be possible to do this you would again need a structural engineer's report and building consent.

As for pricing it's impossible to say but loft conversions normally start at about £25,000  for a small basic bedroom addition and go upwards from £35,000 for bedroom and bathroom.

20  DIY Forum / DIY - Building Questions / Attic conversion
 on: Nov 30th, 2017, 8:49pm 
Started by JohnOmcc1983 | Post by JohnOmcc1983  
Hi.
I am thinking about converting my aticket into a bedroom. The roof has a support beam running along it.  I am the middle house in a bank of 3 houses.  The beam is actually 2 beams that run from the houses either side of me and join in the middle of my attic. Picture attached

I have a couple of queries

- how could this beam be replacedar by a metal beam, without taking the whole roof off?

-  could the angled support bit of wood be safely removed? May be replaced with a vertical one or as it resting on a load bearing wall, could I build the wall up to support the beam?

- I was thinking about an extension on one side of the roof. Taking the slant away and squaring it up. Do you have a rough estimate on how much it would cost?

Thanks in advance

John

Support beam

21  DIY Forum / DIY - Electrical Questions / Re: extend a power cable
 on: Nov 23rd, 2017, 9:24am 
Started by MikeW | Post by Natedog  
Is the flex permenantly attached or.does it plug I  with a kettle lead type connector?  If it plugs in then that would be the easiest solution, long leads are easy to get

22  DIY Forum / DIY - Plumbing Questions / Re: Fitting radiator tails
 on: Nov 22nd, 2017, 6:06pm 
Started by londonman | Post by londonman  
Thanks, mate.  I was hoping you'd be along with some good advice and you sure have.  Got some 55 today and it's the DB's.  Smiley

23  DIY Forum / DIY - Plumbing Questions / Re: Fitting radiator tails
 on: Nov 21st, 2017, 11:11pm 
Started by londonman | Post by thescruff  
Loctite 55 string every time.

Lightly run a hacksaw across the threads stops the tape moving, not needed with loctite 55

24  DIY Forum / DIY - Electrical Questions / Re: extend a power cable
 on: Nov 21st, 2017, 8:36pm 
Started by MikeW | Post by Lectrician  
Replacing the flex would be preferred.

Or, even better, a ceiling mounted socket and Fused Spur Outlet.

25  DIY Forum / DIY - Electrical Questions / extend a power cable
 on: Nov 21st, 2017, 5:52pm 
Started by MikeW | Post by MikeW  
Simple question really....& yes, I will try to find a reasonable sparks to help out when we figure out the best route!

We have a big new projector screen to use with a new projector.  The projector is "ultra short throw", which means it sits on a table 40cm from the wall and throws a 100" display - very impressive!

The electric screen, however, arrived with about a 5' lead.   Not even long enough to reach the floor Sad  

Don't really want to have it dangling to an extension cord (as we have at the moment!) - would like to route it either round the ceiling and down the corner, or round a door frame behind the screen when down.

Question is this: to avoid a lumpy extension plug, & therefore to be able to hide the power in a 16mm duct box, what is the best/safest/easiest (perm any 2 from 3 perhaps!!) way to extend the cable?
I read about cutting & soldering, also 'butt connector' crimps, as well as spliceline connectors.
In the distant past I have used 'choc blox' connectors to good effect, but I am sure there are neater/safer/tidier ways.

Welcome the thoughts.   In Leicester area in case there are trades here who can offer to help (at a cost!) - new to the forum so maybe that is not allowed!

26  DIY Forum / DIY - Plumbing Questions / Fitting radiator tails
 on: Nov 21st, 2017, 10:56am 
Started by londonman | Post by londonman  
Any recommendations?  I've tried loads of PTFE tape (wound the right way!)  but find that it is so slippy that when fitting the valves, the slightest movement in the 'undo' direction and the tail feels as if it will weep.

The tails aren't tapered - at least as far as I can see - which rules out, I think Boss White.  Very sloppy fit as well which possible rules out stuff like Loctite 577 ?

TIA

27  DIY Forum / DIY - Plumbing Questions / Re: Pipes banging when nothing being used
 on: Nov 21st, 2017, 7:44am 
Started by TrevorP | Post by thescruff  
Shutting the stopcock won't reduce the pressure. Turning the stopcock right off, before you get to bed, maybe an idea to see whether it still bangs.

Is the bang regular, more or less the same time

28  DIY Forum / DIY - Plumbing Questions / Re: Pipes banging when nothing being used
 on: Nov 20th, 2017, 12:11pm 
Started by TrevorP | Post by TrevorP  
Just to add
It is a one off bang, and does not do it when boiler fires up, or taps turned on, or toilet flushed.
Stumped me!

29  DIY Forum / DIY - Plumbing Questions / Re: Pipes banging when nothing being used
 on: Nov 20th, 2017, 12:07pm 
Started by TrevorP | Post by TrevorP  
Thanks for replies, it sounds like pipes banging together, have found two in boiler area, and separated, but still it happens.
Def not CH as this happens throughout the night when nothing at all is being used.
Have managed to turn stop cock, which was fully opened, and closed to within one turn open, just to see if this helps, will have to wait a bit to see if any success.
Will keep you posted.
Thanks again

30  DIY Forum / DIY - Plumbing Questions / Re: Pipes banging when nothing being used
 on: Nov 19th, 2017, 10:52pm 
Started by TrevorP | Post by thescruff  
CWatters wrote on Nov 19th, 2017, 10:19pm:
Every 15-20 mins could be the central heating firing up/shutting off. Could it be heating pipes expanding/contracting?


Going to be something like that CW.

Maybe no water in the header tank ? could be virtually anything at the moment