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Kitchen Floor (Read 5335 times)
PEDANTICVINDICTIVEMAN
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #15 - May 11th, 2004, 8:55pm
 
Does Tyson bite peoples ears  Grin
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thescruff
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #14 - May 8th, 2004, 12:25pm
 
I would prefer to see the old tiles removed, easy to do with a spade, just take a couple up then slide the sharp end under the tiles.

Floor leveling compond is available from Jewsons and the likes, mix to a runny paste pour on floor and spread with a plastering float, leave for 24 + hours to dry.

Glazed floor tiles are layed the same as wall tiles but with a different adhesive.

Setting out is important for a good job so forward planning is best sorted before you start, lay a row in each direction to space the edges equally, then use a chalk line to get the first row square and paralle.

Finally don't mix to much adhesive at a time.

scruff
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Little_Miss_DIY
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #13 - May 8th, 2004, 11:05am
 
Thanks for the replies  Smiley

I have looked at the self-adhesive tiles and other kinds of flooring, and decided I would prefer ceramic.

Quote:
Posted by Kesh. Why do the existing tiles need to be sealed?  They would make the perfect surface after cleaning & de-greasing to lay new tiles onto.


Quote:
Posted by: Coggy. I suppose they would if they are level but you would create a small step into that room, and all the tiles need to be secure etc. Also will the new tiles grip to the old tiles ok??


The tiles that are down at the mo, I would prefer to leave cus they are flat, level and flush to the walls, in good condition and already they are a "step" down from the flooring that joins when you enter the room.

As for the cold floor, well that's something I appreciate in the summer, so isn't really an issue  Smiley

Thanks


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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #12 - May 8th, 2004, 12:22am
 
I have spanish glazed tiles throughout the ground floor as I hate carpets.

Been down for nearly 10 years and no chips, cracks or movement, I wouldn't change them for anything.

Fair comment they feel cold to walk on with bare feet  Undecided But they also feel cool in the hot weather which is a plus.

scruff
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #11 - May 7th, 2004, 11:51pm
 
My house was built with thermoplastic tiles in 1966. Held down with a bitumastic glue.
My wife wanted vinyl self adhesive tiles in the bathroom because she wanted a different colour.
In well over 30 years only 2 tiles have lost their grip.
She wanted a vinyl roll in the kitchen. I laid it over newspaper to stop it sticking to the tiles.
Waste of time that was. The vinyl started wearing opposite the back door (right by the cooker).
I went to lift the vinyl when the wear was so bad it was lifting making it dangerous.
Various spills over the years had kept the newspaper permanently wet & the tiles cracked.
The concrete screed by the door had a crack from one side to the other.
I was left with a horrible black mess of the bitumastic
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #10 - May 7th, 2004, 11:29pm
 
That's what it boils down to - personal preferances - Ya pays yer money & ya takes yer choice. Smiley
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Uhh... I must have forgot something else!
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #9 - May 7th, 2004, 11:17pm
 
Cheers Kesh

Yes ours has only been down a couple of days.  It has had a 6 1/2 stone Rottweiler running and skiddin all over it (a he does) and its managing with that ok and he has quite sharp nails. When i say skiddin i dont mean the floor is slippy because it is not at all it is really warm and not slippy at all, but Tyson skids even on the carpet its his party trick lol

I will let people know how it looks in a few months time but was well impressed with the quality when i laid it.  I don't like ceramic because they can chip and be very very slippy when they are wet, and also cold to walk on.

Thanks Kesh
Coggy
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #8 - May 7th, 2004, 10:58pm
 
Hello Cogs, OK a small step for Little Miss DIY would be better than the drastic step of hacking the existing tiles off.

She didn't mention anything about un-secure tiles, so I assume they're good.

Believe it or not - tile adhesive sticks better than the proverbial **** to a shovel on either side of the tile (glazed or not).

I see you are keen to promote your vinyl alternative - be warned, they are easy to scuff, are prone to colision damage with sharp objects (Don't drop any cutlery), but worst of all, the adhesive used doesn't last that well, & tends to lift with time.
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Uhh... I must have forgot something else!
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #7 - May 7th, 2004, 10:36pm
 
I suppose they would if they are level but you would create a small step into that room, and all the tiles need to be secure etc. Also will the new tiles grip to the old tiles ok??


Just my thoughts really
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #6 - May 7th, 2004, 10:31pm
 
Back to the original question - Why do the existing tiles need to be sealed?  They would make the perfect surface after cleaning & de-greasing to lay new tiles onto.
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Uhh... I must have forgot something else!
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #5 - May 7th, 2004, 4:20pm
 
I think that is good advice coggy.

One of the possible issues with ceramic tiles is that if you walk on them with bare feet in the winter months they can be a bit cold to the touch.

Also, the sticky-on tiles are somewhat more absorbent to abuse than ceramic. Drop a saucepan on ceramic tiles and you are probably looking at a major renovation operation digging the old tile out and replacing it. Drop the same saucepan on plastic flooring and not usually anything to report back to Houston.

Andrew
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #4 - May 7th, 2004, 10:16am
 
Hi LMD

Just a thought, have you seen those self adhesive vinyl floor tiles that you get from Wickes etc ?
They come in many different effects, marble, slate, etc etc.
They are really easy to lay, i put one down yesterday and was really impressed with them.  We went for the slate effect and it looks really nice and unlike ceramic tiles is not slippy at all.

The prices range from between 3 / 5 m2.

You could just put hardboard down on your concrete floor and then peel off the backs of the tiles and stick them down.  If you wanted to seal the concrete floor again Wickes, B&q sell a floor sealer that you just paint on first, i think its like a bitumen type paint, and thats it.

If you still want ceramic then ignore this but thought i would post because i am well pleased with ours. Wink
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #3 - May 7th, 2004, 7:16am
 
Thank you, HM & Scruff,  Smiley

The floor, at the moment, has ceramic tiles laid on concrete.  The tiles to be put down are also ceramic.

I'd like to be able to tackle the sealing and tiling myself, eventually.

Realistically speaking, is this a task a "first timer" should be able to complete?  Undecided

Thanks  Smiley
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #2 - May 7th, 2004, 6:44am
 
Would apply to concrete floors which are porrous, normally an acrilic based self level compond is spread over the flooor, ( smells ghastley ) as it contain ammonia

For tiling over wooden floors lay hardboard and tile on that.

scruff
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Re: Kitchen Floor
Reply #1 - May 7th, 2004, 6:25am
 
What type of floor is there already onto which the tiles are to be fitted? Wooden floorboards or concrete?

What type of tiles? Wood, ceramic, or plastic?

Sealing is usually undertaken to prevent moisture coming up from below. You need a moisture barrier. This invariably takes the form of a rubberised sheet - think in terms of thick dustbin liner.

Not always quite so simple though because you have to make sure that the surface on which the sheet is being laid is perfectly flat - no specs of dust etc which could puncture the sheet (the sheet isn't very thick).

Andrew
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Little_Miss_DIY
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Kitchen Floor
May 7th, 2004, 2:36am
 
Smiley

Hi,

Could somebody please explain what "sealing" is  ???

Apparently, my kitchen floor needs to be sealed before applying tiles.

Thanks
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