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bleeding (Read 3140 times)
billythekid
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Re: bleeding
Reply #10 - Aug 30th, 2005, 11:33am
 
[quote author=hamilton  link=1122334384/0#1 date=1122392584]There is the odd chip where the dopey cow hits the door frames with the vacuum cleaner [/quote]
fantastic! lol


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sailfishoney
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Re: bleeding
Reply #9 - Aug 28th, 2005, 7:47am
 
15 years ago. Time to buy new and really make her happy.lol
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hammy
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Re: bleeding
Reply #8 - Jul 27th, 2005, 10:31pm
 
Mick

Preparation is everything, wash it, rub it, and paint it.

Alluminium flake primer is a dark grey colour, so will need two undercoats and a finish coat (assuming you are using white).
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typical.me
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Re: bleeding
Reply #7 - Jul 27th, 2005, 9:24pm
 
Thanx for that Hamilton, Do i still do the normal preparation, clean and gentle rub down etc, as my "good lady" has another room she wants sorting, and again that is varnished in the water based stuff.
mick
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hammy
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Re: bleeding
Reply #6 - Jul 27th, 2005, 4:09pm
 
Not had it happen to me, so can't comment too much.

Alluminium flake primer should be good in this situation, it dries in overlapping flakes so nothing should bleed through. It is used on top of bitumen coated pipes before painting and stops that bleeding through.

Also good on highly resinous woods.
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typical.me
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Re: bleeding
Reply #5 - Jul 27th, 2005, 12:38am
 
Cheers Dewy,
at least i know it isnt just me having "senior moments"
mick
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Dewy
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Re: bleeding
Reply #4 - Jul 26th, 2005, 10:46pm
 
My local were replacing all the stools.
I got one of the old broken ones and repaired it then tried to paint over the stained varnish.
The paint solvent disolved the stain.
It took me 4-5 coats before the stain stopped running.
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typical.me
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Re: bleeding
Reply #3 - Jul 26th, 2005, 10:43pm
 
Thanx guys, will do as you suggest.

Just another point, when i prepared woodwork in another room for painting, (which was stained ronseal canadian ceder and varnished) slight rub down, 2 ucoats and eggshell topcoat, it was even worse!!. The varnish that was on was the water based stuff, cuprinol. After several top coats I  had to replace skirting boards and start from scratch as i couldnt stop the bleeding through!!
Is this a problem with the water based stuff, ie difficult to prepare and finish?
cheers
Mick
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Chaddy
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Re: bleeding
Reply #2 - Jul 26th, 2005, 7:16pm
 
Had a job like this recently. Had to gloss over a stained handrail.

Did exactly as hamilton said.....key it up first, two coats of undercoat with a sand down(180grit) in between coats. A good coat of gloss.

Came up lovely. No signs of the stain.

Should be no problem. Let us know how you get on. good luck. Grin
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« Last Edit: Jul 26th, 2005, 11:33pm by Chaddy »  

What do you mean "how much" !!!
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hammy
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Re: bleeding
Reply #1 - Jul 26th, 2005, 4:43pm
 
Mick

Had a job like this some time ago. After washing the woodwork I rubbed it down, (you have to do this) to give it a key, then gave it a coat of white undercoat.

Let it dry, lightly rub down again being careful not to go through the paint, and then gave it another undercoat.
When dry I gave it all one coat of white gloss.

There is the odd chip where the dopey cow hits the door frames with the vacuum cleaner, but this would happen anyway.

Was your stain actually bleeding through, or was it that you could still see it through the two coats that you put on?
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typical.me
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bleeding
Jul 26th, 2005, 12:33am
 
Hiya,
Can anyone suggest a way to prepare stain and varnished woodwork prior to painting?
I actually stained and varnished my doors and skirting boards 15 years ago, now her indoors wants to go all modern and spoil it!! I used ronseal stain and ronseal varnish (not the water based stuff)
I dont really want to rub it all down, cos i tried to do a door with a gentle rub down, and after ucoat and top coat, the stain is bleeding through. Also it seems it is prone to chipping really easily. I used ultra fix from dulux as a primer, and top coat of dulux eggshell. Any one to help??
cheers
Mick
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