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Keen newbie trying to build a small artist's study (Read 2503 times)
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Re: Keen newbie trying to build a small artist's study
Reply #4 - Jul 21st, 2014, 8:00pm
 
Could also look at veneered mdf if you wanted a real wood appearance?

Might also be worth a look at a local auction site for materials or furniture that could be recycled.  Lots of office shelving and chairs at the one near me. Comes up every week.

I recently made a mirror frame and had mirror cut to fit - then discovered old mirrors go for peanuts at the local auction. I guess people see an ugly frame and forget the mirror in the middle could be reframed.
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Re: Keen newbie trying to build a small artist's study
Reply #3 - Jul 21st, 2014, 5:29pm
 
Routing out for Tonk strips is a difficult process, you can get a specific router bit for this which makes it easier, as it is hard to get a long straight groove.

I would make the whole thing from 18mm MDF, and put a decent upstand on the shelves. For the sides I would pin a 36mm strip of beech over the edges to hide the joint. If you rout out for tonk strips on both sides of a board you will have too little wood left to screw into. Plus the weight of MDF can be a real problem.

Shelf up stands are just glued and screwed to the shelf back edge, they are not normally fixed to the wall.

If I were making this I would rebate the back edge of the sides, bottom and top and fit a 12mm back. If you will never see the back you could just screw the back in place without bothering to rebate anything.

I would at least prime and undercoat before assembly. I topcoat in the workshop partly because I spray. (If you want to get a decent finish use a small foam roller rather than try to brush it on)

As for getting wood cut I suppose it depends who cuts it. If they are any good they should be accurate to a mm.
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Re: Keen newbie trying to build a small artist's study
Reply #2 - Jul 20th, 2014, 8:54pm
 
Thanks for the reply. I hadn't ever heard about Tonk strips and it potentially solves the problem that I have for precise book sizes needing to be accommodated. I do have access to a router, so even though I've never used one before I could potentially sink the strips into the side pillars of the bookcase.

What would you advise me to do with the side pillars? Should I just get extremely thick MDF or is there a more elegant or effective solution? Using two strips together, perhaps? Strength is key for this project though and I do intend to screw it to the wall. I had intended to get a framework up using some softwood strips of roughly the size you mentioned. If I were to use the Tonk strips however, would I  want to fix the supports you mentioned to the back wall of the shelf as well?

I've never had a good deal of wood cut to size before. If I gave them cutting plans would they be able to get the wood exactly the sizes that I need them?

Looking ahead to finishing the wood, would I be better to treat and paint the strips before-hand, or should I just paint them once they are in place?

I'm sure I have more questions, but I can't pull them out of my inexperienced head yet, but thank you for getting me on the right track so far.  Smiley

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Re: Keen newbie trying to build a small artist's study
Reply #1 - Jul 20th, 2014, 7:24pm
 
MDF is probably your best material but even 25mm will sag if you put a lot of weight on it. One way to stiffen the shelves is to put an upstand (basically a narrowish 60-70mm piece across the back which you screw and glue in place).

IKEA units are a cheap way of producing something like this but they are very difficult to alter or cut down as the panels usually have a hollow core.

You could use Tonk strips (Google it) to rest the shelves on, you can get one that just screws onto the face of the board, rather than the inset ones which are much harder to fit as you need to cut a two depth slot.

Having the MDF cut to size is a good idea, you should be able to produce an accurate cutting list, don't be tempted to get them cut a bit oversize, cutting a couple of mm off is very difficult without machinery.

You will need to screw this to the wall.

I hope that helps.

If you have any specific questions ask away.
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Keen newbie trying to build a small artist's study
Jul 20th, 2014, 5:03pm
 
Hi everyone,

I have a very small bedroom that I would like to turn into a custom built study. I was looking at buying Ikea bookshelves and perhaps adapting them to purpose, but given I would rather have something that is properly built to my needs as a digital artist, I think I may have to do a proper job.

I have made a first stab at designing the desk, cupboards and shelves as shown here:
...

I'm essentially looking for advice on what materials I should use. I've defaulted to MDF Caberlite Panel 25 x 2440 x 1220mm cut down to size by whoever I can get to provide it. I would have preferred real wood, but I need quite deep shelving for my paper stock and equipment and after asking a timber yard, I could barely get half the depth of shelving that I need. I also selected 25mm because I have a lot of heavy books that need housing.

I can be quite handy, but I've never taken on a project this size as this is my first house that hasn't been rented.

Has anyone got any guidance or advice for a keen noob?

Thanks in advance.
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