Welcome To Ask The Trades!

Quote: Half the people you know are below average.
  HomeHelpSearchLoginRegisterPM to admin  
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
oiling new oak worktops (Read 1058 times)
Sandy
Full Member
***
Offline


Posts: 178
Total Thanks: 0
For This Post: 0


Gender: male

Re: oiling new oak worktops
Reply #10 - Dec 6th, 2016, 2:05pm
 
Hi Wozzy,

Dunno if my two-penneth will be still valid as by now I expect you've worked it out.

I'm a big fan of the Osmo Polyx (just to be clear, I'm also in no way sponsored by them) and I've used it on my oak floors, oak doors, skirts and architraves. I cannot stress the importance of following the advice given above. spread very thin on first coat (not watered down, just very sparingly). I actually wiped the oil on and rubbed down after 10/15mins later, followed by the day after rubbed very lightly with a 320G paper to "denib" the finish. Doors, flooring, skirts etc only needed 2 coats.

My naivety and haste led to my applying the oil too heavily in one area of my flooring, so my only words of caution would be go easy and pay attention to the drying and curing time. The tin says that the oil can dry in 8hrs, so you can (in theory) apply multiple coats in one day. However, it takes a good few days in optimal conditions to really cure. I found this out to my disappointment in one area that I sat a table on too soon and dented the finish. Therefore, If using on a worktop, exercise caution with heavy pots/pans or hot objects for a good few days after final coat. I would also consider at least 3 coats on a worktop.

I also used the Osmo on some furniture I made for my little boy as it's considered "food safe" (if i recall correctly). I did about 4 coats of this followed by a good rub down with Liberon Bison wax and it comes up wonderful.

ps Any pics of the finished job???
Back to top
 
Thank User For This Post  
IP Logged
 
woodsmith
Global Moderator
Trade Member
Author
*****
Offline


Posts: 4137
Total Thanks: 70
For This Post: 0


Gender: male

Trade: Joiner

Re: oiling new oak worktops
Reply #9 - Nov 7th, 2016, 5:53pm
 
Oil finishes soak into the wood whereas varnish tends to sit on top of the wood, waxoils seem to do a bit of both; when I tested finishes I found the Fiddes was more of a varnish than, say, Osmo, which is why I've never used it for worktops. Also I did use Fiddes to treat some windows, and so put it on thicker than I would have done for internal woodwork, and after about 2 years it started to peel off like a badly applied varnish

I would say you should just keep applying thin coats until you get to a point that water sits on top and won't soak in. Don't be tempted to put thicker coats on unless you want a varnished look; in which case you would have been better of varnishing it in the first place Grin
Back to top
 
Thank User For This Post WWW View members image gallery  
IP Logged
 
wozzy
Trade Member
*****
Offline

Ask The Trades
Posts: 563
Total Thanks: 3
For This Post: 0


Gender: male

Trade: Electrician



Re: oiling new oak worktops
Reply #8 - Nov 7th, 2016, 9:26am
 
still playing with this, and got a day off today due to the weather so will get another coat on.  

ok the waxy film disappears after a day it sort of hardens up.  it seems this stuff needs a lot longer than it says on the tin to dry completely.  

been checking the sample with two coats on it with water droplets, the just brush one is really good with water it sits on it until dry and then wipes off, the brush and wipe one is terrible after two coats! water goes through the oil and stains, so it will need more than two i would imagine.  

The just brush on one is a bit of quandary its alot shinier (non desirable) but the colour of the wood is bought out more and after two coats it seems to have developed a proper coating on top that once dry is rock hard more like lacquer, and doesnt seem to stain at all with water, im just not confident in getting a good finish even with running some 320 over it between coats, I also was told the protection is best off in the wood not on top of it when i done the floor is the same true for worktops which see alot more water?

Even with this hassle i still think it looks good.
Back to top
 

All advice is at least two years out of date.
Thank User For This Post View members image gallery  
IP Logged
 
woodsmith
Global Moderator
Trade Member
Author
*****
Offline


Posts: 4137
Total Thanks: 70
For This Post: 0


Gender: male

Trade: Joiner

Re: oiling new oak worktops
Reply #7 - Nov 5th, 2016, 8:11am
 
wozzy wrote on Nov 4th, 2016, 1:20pm:
yeh im realising that with the same piece.  

The sample piece that has been clothed both times has had two coats now colour is good, its left a waxy film on top nothing too dramatic not sticky more grippy, you can sort of scrape it with finger nails and leave a line in the film is this normal or have my coats been too thick even with clothing?

Also just put a coat on the actual work top cut edges (sink and hob) are two coats on these good enough?

Thanks


Sounds like you are still putting it on too thick, although I haven't used Fiddes for worktops so it may be a bit more waxy than what I'm used to; I did a test of various finishes a few years back and Fiddes did not come out well so I've never used it.

With edges that can't be seen, I would normally rub in a silicon sealant to permanently seal the endgrain. For edges you can see it's just a case of applying lots of coats, the first coat can be applied liberally, left for 10 minutes then the excess removed with a cloth to get as much finish into the end grain.

Looking forward to a finished picture Smiley
Back to top
 
Thank User For This Post WWW View members image gallery  
IP Logged
 
wozzy
Trade Member
*****
Offline

Ask The Trades
Posts: 563
Total Thanks: 3
For This Post: 0


Gender: male

Trade: Electrician



Re: oiling new oak worktops
Reply #6 - Nov 4th, 2016, 1:21pm
 
may treat you all to a picture when its all done!  Smiley
Back to top
 

All advice is at least two years out of date.
Thank User For This Post View members image gallery  
IP Logged
 
wozzy
Trade Member
*****
Offline

Ask The Trades
Posts: 563
Total Thanks: 3
For This Post: 0


Gender: male

Trade: Electrician



Re: oiling new oak worktops
Reply #5 - Nov 4th, 2016, 1:20pm
 
yeh im realising that with the same piece.  

The sample piece that has been clothed both times has had two coats now colour is good, its left a waxy film on top nothing too dramatic not sticky more grippy, you can sort of scrape it with finger nails and leave a line in the film is this normal or have my coats been too thick even with clothing?

Also just put a coat on the actual work top cut edges (sink and hob) are two coats on these good enough?

Thanks
Back to top
 

All advice is at least two years out of date.
Thank User For This Post View members image gallery  
IP Logged
 
woodsmith
Global Moderator
Trade Member
Author
*****
Offline


Posts: 4137
Total Thanks: 70
For This Post: 0


Gender: male

Trade: Joiner

Re: oiling new oak worktops
Reply #4 - Nov 4th, 2016, 7:40am
 
Definitely brush and cloth off, if you don't cloth off you will get a less even finish and I've had it take days to completely dry.
Back to top
 
Thank User For This Post WWW View members image gallery  
IP Logged
 
wozzy
Trade Member
*****
Offline

Ask The Trades
Posts: 563
Total Thanks: 3
For This Post: 0


Gender: male

Trade: Electrician



Re: oiling new oak worktops
Reply #3 - Nov 3rd, 2016, 9:19pm
 
The instructions are for installing belfast sinks and general how to install does not say much about oiling just do it and follow oil instructions.  Does not mention hard wax or danish or whats preferable.  

Used the fiddles on a off cut.  

One half was brushed on and then had a cloth run over it so rub in / remove excess.  
This changed the colour a little and left the surface dryish to touch after five minutes and feels smooth.

The other half i brushed on and left.  It changed the colour more significantly and left a bit of a wet look which took a couple of hours to soak in and now feels a little sticky.

Both times it was applied fairly thin.  

I know I have to leave it till tomorrow for another coat but which one sounds nearer the mark brush and cloth or brush alone?

Thanks for the input lads, im alot more worried about ballsing this up than I was oiling the floors with maintenance oil which was a doddle!
Back to top
 

All advice is at least two years out of date.
Thank User For This Post View members image gallery  
IP Logged
 
londonman
Trade Member
*****
Offline

I love YaBB 1G - SP1!

Posts: 1600
Total Thanks: 5
For This Post: 0


Malvern, United Kingdom
Malvern
United Kingdom


Trade: Cabinet Maker

Re: oiling new oak worktops
Reply #2 - Nov 2nd, 2016, 2:27pm
 
Wot he says!

The critical thing with all oil finishes is not to be tempted to think 'I'll try a short cut and wang on a great big thick coat'. You will end up with a disaster on your hands. A great big foul smelling (which is why I don't use oil as it happens..hate it!) sticky mess.

Thin. Sparing. Wipe off excess.
Back to top
 

Would all Third Party Apologists kindly mind their own business .....
Thank User For This Post View members image gallery  
IP Logged
 
woodsmith
Global Moderator
Trade Member
Author
*****
Offline


Posts: 4137
Total Thanks: 70
For This Post: 0


Gender: male

Trade: Joiner

Re: oiling new oak worktops
Reply #1 - Nov 1st, 2016, 11:08pm
 
If you have instructions with the worktops they possibly are for oiling, which means using Danish oil or finishing oil and these need a lot of coats and regular re-coating. Hardwax oils are different and usually need two or three coats and then re-coating only when they start to show signs of wear.

If you have some Fiddes then I would try it on an offcut first if you can. Apply it with a brush sparingly then use a lint free cloth to rub it in until the wood is almost dry to the touch. Repeat daily until the surface has a good even finish.

You will probably be fine with the Fiddes but if you don't think it's working well Osmo make a hardwax oil specifically designed for this called Topoil, it's thinner and is easier to apply than the other options, such as Osmo Polyx, and I've had good results with it although my better half still prefers Polyx.
Back to top
« Last Edit: Nov 1st, 2016, 11:09pm by woodsmith »  
Thank User For This Post WWW View members image gallery  
IP Logged
 
wozzy
Trade Member
*****
Offline

Ask The Trades
Posts: 563
Total Thanks: 3
For This Post: 0


Gender: male

Trade: Electrician



oiling new oak worktops
Nov 1st, 2016, 10:05pm
 
Never done it before so after some tips, application and number of coats ect, what it says on the tin and the paperwork with the worktop somewhat conflict.  

got some Fiddes Hard Wax Oil if that makes a difference.  


Thanks  Smiley
Back to top
 

All advice is at least two years out of date.
Thank User For This Post View members image gallery  
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print